Ikanyeng Gaodirelwe

Associate Researcher

Ms. Ikanyeng Gaodirelwe joined the Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis (BIDPA) in September 2019 as an Associate Researcher (Environmental Science Specialist) in the Environment, Agriculture and Natural Resources unit. She holds a Master of Philosophy in Natural Resources Management from the Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana, and a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science from the University of Botswana. Before joining BIDPA, Ms. Gaodirelwe was a Project Officer-Sustainable Land Management at UNDP (Kgalagadi & Ghanzi Drylands Ecosystem project). Ikanyeng had a career spanning for 10 years with the Department of Wildlife & National parks as a wildlife officer in the Community Extension and Outreach division. Her research interests broadly include Community Based Natural Resource Management(CBNRM), Biodiversity conservation, Rural development and climate change issues.

Consultancies

Overseen the development and implementation of the following;

  1. Public awareness Strategy for the Department of Wildlife and National Parks under the Government and GEF funded Kgalagadi & Ghanzi Drylands Ecosystem Project, 2019
  2. Gender Mainstreaming Strategy under the Government and GEF funded Kgalagadi & Ghanzi Drylands Ecosystem Project, 2019

Publications

  1. Gaodirelwe, I. Motsholapheko, M. R. & Masunga, G. S. (2020): Community perceptions of wildlife management strategies and subsistence poaching in the Okavango delta, Botswana. Journal of Human Dimensions.
  2. Gaodirelwe, I. Motsholapheko, M. R. & Masunga, G. S. (2018). CBNRM; a promising strategy in reducing subsistence poaching around protected areas, Northern Botswana. Journal of Environment Development & Sustainability, doi.org/10.1007/s10668-018-0288-7
  3. Gaodirelwe, I., Motsholapheko, M. R., Masunga, G. S. & Kgathi, D.L. (2015). Effects of wildlife commercialization on poaching in Ngamiland District [Abstract]. Botswana Symposium on Wetlands and Wildlife 2015. Natural resource research: implications for management and conservation.